NIFC’s Wildland Fire Outlook

At the start of each month, the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) produces a 3 month significant wildland fire potential and weather outlook for the entire country. The Wildland Fire Potential map shows a national picture of the expected trend for fire activity and growth based on previous fire history and current weather predictions. This information is used by Fire Managers to determine staffing levels, anticipate large fire growth, and prepare for the need for pre-positioning out of area resources.

month1_outlook.pngBased on the current forecasts from NIFC and the drought conditions, October will likely bring above normal potential for wildland fires in California. This time of year also brings the potential for Santa Ana wind events over Southern California. Much of the nation will see normal to below normal fire potential, due in part to the significant rains that have impacted much of the country in the last week.

To see the NIFC Significant Fire Potential predictions for the months of November and December, click the link below.

http://www.predictiveservices.nifc.gov/outlooks/monthly_seasonal_outlook.pdf

Sundowner Winds and Their Impact on Fire Behavior

A sundowner wind is an offshore northerly Foehn wind that occurs near Santa Barbara, California. The winds surface when a ridge of high pressure is directly north of the area, and they blow with greatest force when the pressure gradient is perpendicular to the axis of the Santa Ynez Mountains which rise directly behind Santa Barbara. These winds often precede Santa Ana events by a day or two, as it is normal for high-pressure areas to migrate east, causing the pressure gradients to shift to the northeast.

 

Sundowner winds are dried and heated by the warm inland valleys and deserts. As narrow canyons and valleys compress the winds, they become stronger and overpower the diurnal winds. Firefighting efforts during a sundowner wind event can become extremely difficult. The Jesusita fire in May 2009 burned 8,733 acres and destroyed 80 homes while damaging 15 more. Most of the destruction occurred while sundowner winds pushed the main fire through populated areas. The Painted Cave Fire during June 1990 rapidly grew to 5,000 acres, destroying 427 buildings and killing 1 civilian.

 

RedZone’s Experienced Wildfire Liaisons Connect IMTs to Private Response Teams

 

When RedZone clients dispatch their private resources to respond to a wildfire, RedZone provides an on-scene Liaison to facilitate access and coordinate efforts with the local Incident Command personnel as required by federal, state, and local guidelines.

RedZone’s Liaison staff has over 70 combined years of experience responding to major wildfires as well as other types of natural disasters, and enjoy an impeccable reputation among Incident Command personnel throughout the country.  Because of this reputation, Liaisons are able to gain access to the Incident Command Post of a given fire and obtain permission for the private resources to maneuver within the emergency deployment area and perform mitigation tactics on specific homes.

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Throughout the duration of the incident, Liaisons will communicate the teams’ locations and coordinate movements within the area, attend operational briefings and planning meetings as necessary, and provide the Incident Management Team (IMT) with a direct communications link to the private resources in the field.  Liaisons will also deliver regular status updates to RedZone’s intelligence staff to be disseminated to clients via the RZAlert product.

In the offseason, RedZone Liaisons make presentations for regional Incident Management Team meetings and perform outreach to fire professionals on behalf of RedZone’s insurance carrier clientele.  They also conduct continuing education classes for insurance professionals.

The strong relationships Liaisons foster with Incident Command Teams and the increased safety Liaisons promote among private crews on the fireline make them an integral and indispensable component of RedZone’s wildfire services.