Rocky Mountain Fire: Shenandoah National Park, VA

The Rocky Mountain Fire was first reported on Saturday April 16th, 2016, in the South District of the Shenandoah National Park.  Crews are working hard to keep the fire within the park boundary along Skyline Drive. Due to the complexity of the incident, a Type 1 Incident Commander and the Southern Area Red Command Team will take over management of the fire on Wednesday April 20th.  As of April 19, resources have mapped the fire at 2,094 acres with no reported containment.

The fire has prompted the closure of 15 trails within the park, including a 4 mile section of the popular Appalachian Trail. These closures are in effect until further notice.  No structures or buildings have been reported as damaged to date.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4689/

 

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Newhall Fire: Valencia, CA

A 2-3 acre fire was reported around 7:15 a.m. near Newhall Ranch Road and Copper Hill Drive in Valencia, California on April 15th. The fire grew to 33 acres by 1:00 p.m. due to 25 mph winds in the area. Helicopters were on scene to support firefighters on the ground.

No buildings or houses were damaged, but nearby Albert Einstein Academy was voluntarily evacuated due to the fire. Fire officials have stated that they have the fire 65% contained and have stopped forward progress. Firefighters were expected to extinguish any remaining hot spots in the area throughout the day.

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A screen capture from RedZone’s RZAlert Dashboard

 

Anderson Creek Fire nears containment in Kansas and Oklahoma

The Anderson Creek Fire continued to burn through Kansas from Oklahoma, but was nearing full containment as of March 29. Erratic weather over the preceding weekend prevented daily perimeter flights and hindered firefighters’ efforts. On Monday the 28th, aerial attempts were finally successful, allowing crews to gain a more precise acreage measurement of 367,620 and containment up to 95%. As of Tuesday, March 29th, twelve homes had been reported as destroyed. Blackhawk choppers, along with rain and snow, helped the firefighters improve containment lines and make progress on the fire. The Anderson Creek Fire is the largest wildfire in Kansas history.

The Oklahoma Forestry Service released this fire progression map on March 28th after receiving flight data. The bright red portions in the eastern area show the most recently-active areas of the fire. An unfavorable weather system passed west to east over the area throughout the 28th and 29th, and crews were optimistic about the firefighting plans for the subsequent days.

 

Anderson Creek Fire - OK & KS - Fire Progression by Oklahoma Forestry Services

Anderson Creek Fire – OK & KS – Fire Progression by Oklahoma Forestry Services

 

Anderson Creek Fire

 

Hundreds of firefighters battled a wildfire that burned over 400,000 acres in Kansas and Oklahoma, with about two-thirds of the burning occuring in Kansas. The governor of Kansas declared a State of Emergency on March 23rd, after 45 mph winds caused the fire to grow rapidly. The grass fire was first reported around 5:45 p.m. on March 22nd, in Woods County, Oklahoma. The fire was so large that radar sweeps picked it up, as winds helped spread it north into Kansas.

A statement from the Kansas Adjutant General’s office early March 24th declared the fire “under control” in Comanche County, but not yet to the east in Barber County. It added that voluntary evacuations had ended in the Lake City and Sun City communities. Fire officials stated that numerous communities and structures (800 to 1,000 homes) remained under threat as of March 25th. Two houses to the north of Medicine Lodge and two bridges in Barber County were destroyed by the fire.

Fire officials in Barber County anticipated that the blaze would continue through March 25th and were hopeful that they could get better control of it over the subsequent days. The National Weather Service said 25 mph winds are forecast in the area until noon on the 25th, when they were expected to drop to 15 mph and then to 10 mph by sunset. Humidity levels were also expected to improve throughout the day, making progress on containment more likely. As of March 25, the cause of the fire was still under investigation.

http://www.kake.com/home/headlines/Mile-wide-grass-fire-in-Comanche-County-373205531.html

Image of the Anderson Creek Fire courtesy of the Oklahoma Forestry Services

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Brushfire consumes 2,500 acres on the island of Oahu

Oahu Brushfire Burns 2,500 acres

On Thursday, March 17th, Oahu Fire Department responded to reports of a brush fire near the community of Nanakuli. Arriving units reported a fast moving fire burning in light to medium fuels with limited access. The fire was driven by steep, inaccessible terrain and gusty winds. As of March 22, 2016, the fire was reported at 2,500 acres and 80% contained. No homes had been reported as damaged, though early on in the fire there were voluntary evacuations in place and some road closures.

For further information and updates, follow the story on KHON2.com.

 

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Guadalupe Pass Fire active in Southern New Mexico

The Guadalupe Pass Fire started in the Penloncillo Mountains in the Coronado National Forest in New Mexico shortly after 5:30 am on March 2nd. As of March 4th, the fire had burned 5,100 acres and was 15% contained. The fire burned in grass and brush and is exhibited moderate fire behavior with winds around 15 mph, according to fire officials. The fire was determined to have been human-caused, but specific information pertaining to the ignition source was still under investigation with local Law Enforcement Agencies as of March 4th.

Approximately 120 firefighters were called to the scene and performed burn out operations on the south end of the mountains near Guadalupe Pass. Fire officials had expected to increase the percentage of containment over the initial several days, although acreage was expected to increase as burn out operations continued. The closest structures were three miles away to the North, Northeast, and West of the fire and were not threatened.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4664/

 

 

Guadalupe Fire Perimeter as of 3/4/2016 – Reported at 5,100 acres

Wildfires active in Oklahoma so far in 2016

 Two fire weather events early this year have Oklahoma leading the nation in wildfires to date with 226. Thirteen fires remain uncontained in the state as of March 1, even despite a recent decline in fire weather concern. 

 

 Active Fires in OK as of March 1st, 2016

Multiple red flag warnings were issued for the second time this month as another critical fire weather event took place over the weekend (27th and 28th of February). Fire officials were well prepared for another outbreak as just a week earlier (February 18-19), a number of large wildfires flared up across the state. To date this year there have been 226* wildfires across Oklahoma with the largest (Pharoah Fire) burning over 21,000 acres. The majority of the ignitions have been human-caused, resulting in quick-moving grass fires.  The map above highlights the 13 still-uncontained fires in the state. 

*Source NIFC.GOV

 

Two-alarm brush fire closes Malibu-area highway, now contained

According to the Los Angeles County Fire Department, a brush fire that scorched about 10 acres along the Malibu ridgeline is now 100% contained. Tragically, the incident left a twenty-two year old female inmate, who was deployed as a firefighter, critically injured and airlifted from the scene. She later died from the blow to the head from a falling rock sustained at the fire fight.

 

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Muholland Fire in RedZone’s RZAlert Dashboard

“The last official report we had was that it was 95 percent contained by 8:30 p.m. (Feb 25th) but it’s fully contained now. We just have a few pieces of equipment out at the scene and a small number of firefighters doing mop-up,” said county fire Dispatch Supervisor Miguel Ornelas.

The blaze started in the area of Mulholland Highway and Bardman Street about 3 a.m. on Feb 25th. About 200 firefighters were deployed to the scene, said county fire Dispatch Supervisor Rey Dong.

By about 6:30 a.m. on Feb 25th, the fire was approximately 35 percent contained, and firefighters had stopped the flames from spreading further, said county fire Inspector Randall Wright. By 11 a.m. the fire was 75% contained.

A voluntary evacuation order was in effect for residents in the area. About 80 people, including children and staff members, were at Camp Shalom, where buses were dispatched in case the campers needed to move. Nearby Camp Bloomfield was not affected, according to the sheriff’s department.

Source: Santa Monica Patch

Southeast Maui Brush Fire Scorches 5,300 acres

Five separate fires began along Piilani Highway in Kahikinui, Maui, Monday night around 1800 hrs, according to fire officials. Areas downwind of the quickly-spreading blaze were promptly evacuated as flames forced the closure of Piilani Highway over a four-mile stretch.

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RZAlert Dashboard view of Maui’s 5,300 acre blaze.

The firefight continued this week as local crews attempted to suppress further spread and protect residents in the Kahikinui Homesteads area on the south side of Haleakala. Fire officials stated that bulldozers have been cutting firebreaks above the mauka fire flank and around homes in the Kahikinui Homesteads. Most of the blaze has been inaccessible to ground engines and crews, and air tanker and helicopter water drops have been the only means of suppression.

As of Thursday afternoon the fire continued to have flare ups and interior pockets burning. Maui County GIS mapped the fire at 5,300 acres, showing that it burned all the way to the ocean below the highway as well as far upslope toward Haleakala Crater to an elevation of about 3,500 feet on the mauka side of Piilani Highway. As of Friday morning, the containment of the blaze is being reported at 40%.